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Delhi Lifestyle

Delhi shares its borders with Haryana, Rajasthan, Uttar Pradesh and Punjab, which influence the life-styles and language of the people. Characteristics of its geographical location, its inhabitants are a race blend of tradition and intellect. They are extremely receptive to modern ideas, inventions and the fantasies of the modern social ethos. People belonging to various religious sects, castes and lingual groups live marvelously with each other, with their socio-economic status taking a back seat. Migrations from various parts of India has led to diverse culture coming together in various parts of Delhi. Durga Puja in Delhi celebrated with same enthusiasm as Id is celebrated. The Guru Purab and Christmas carry the same colour as Dewali or Buddha Purnima. The amalgamation of various cultures, traditions, religions has painted Delhi in colour which are brought from all over India.


Today Delhi is a crowded and extremely polluted modern city, which has ancient, crumbling structures cropping up unexpectedly in every area. Although sixty percent of Delhi-ites are born elsewhere, the city's population has grown over forty percent in the last decade and now stands at around fourteen million. Rapid growth has seen Delhi spilling into the surrounding states, creating satellite developments such as Gurgaon to the south. The city has been attracting its fare share of industrial development in the last two decades, with an influx of technocrats, specialists and fortune seekers to match. In a heady atmosphere of optimism, around 9000 new industrial units sprang up every year during the 1990s. Despite this new-found affluence, a staggering third of the city's population lives in the notorious jhuggies - slums often seen clinging to the edge of new developments. With a daily average of around 200 major incidents of crime , including mindless cases of murder accompanying simple robberies, Delhi has gained the dubious reputation of being the crime capital of the country. The poor aren't the only perpetrators of crime - the city's nouveau riche young, burdened with more money than sense, have been responsible for some of the most notorious recent cases.

Today, very few city residents can lay claim to being 'real' Delhi-wallahs, and most of the population of New Delhi comprises Hindu Punjabi families originally from Lahore. In the past decade its population has increased by 50%, largely due to rapid economic expansion and increased job opportunities. The downside of this boom is increased overcrowding, traffic congestion, housing shortages and pollution.