Sex Education - A necessity

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Dr. Ambrish Singal-psychiatrist & Sexologist [acs-usa]

Posted By : Dr. Ambrish Singal-psychiatrist & Sexologist [acs-usa] - M.D (Psychiatry) FIPS, MAPA, MAASECT, FCSEPI, MWASH,ACS

Posted On : Oct 09, 2008 (Views : 12062)

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An Indian  teenager nowadays is exposed to lot of sexually explicit material /stimulus due to a boom in media and information technology.  The exposure is much greater than it was to their parents in their times.


It had made many parents upset on this issue as what to do in this regard and how to deal the situation, about which they themselves have very less know how and  don’t know exactly how to tackle the situation effectively.


Many parents don't discuss sex with their child until they discover their teen has already made difficult sexually related decisions. By this time the teen has probably already engaged in sexual activity. Because the child was not encouraged to discuss sexually related issues from an early age, the teen will feel uncomfortable with the subject matter at this point in time. As a result the teen might lie or tell the parents what they want to hear in order to avoid an awkward situation. The parents may also feel uncomfortable discussing the subject matter with their child and will have difficulty initiating such a conversation.


Experts urge parents to begin appropriate discussions about sexual issues when their children are very young. These discussions will establish sex as an acceptable topic of conversation, let your child know that you are available to help with difficult issues and establish a level of comfort between you and your child for talking about important issues that could have detrimental effects on your child's health. It's never too early to open these discussions. Children have a natural sexual curiosity. It starts within their first year of life, when they discover their genitals. Children can start masturbating anywhere from the age of 2 to their high school years. As soon as a child notices that they are allowed to see one parent in the nude and not the other, or can differentiate between boys and girls, they will have a curiosity about the opposite sex and the parts that make us different. Don't freak out if you find your child half-dressed playing doctor with the kid next door. This simply represents one more reminder that it's never too early to explain to a child what's appropriate behavior.


Children should know that it's not OK for anyone to touch their private area unless they're getting a doctor's physical under your supervision. They should know you are the one they can talk to about private matters and that you promise to not get upset. They should know it's OK to explore their own bodies in private. Eventually they should know the risks and responsibilities associated with being sexually active. The discussion needs to begin now.


IMPORTANT POINTS TO GET DISCUSSED:


1) Prepare yourself.


2) Start by formulating answers to questions your child might ask.


3) Taylor those answers to match your child's age or level of intelligence.


4) Don't confuse a teenager by using language that makes you more comfortable and sacrifices details and important information. Approach your child casually. Make them feel comfortable. Joking is one way to quickly establish a casual atmosphere. Although sex itself is definitely not a laughing matter, you need someway to put the child at ease, and laughter just happens to be one of the most effective ways of doing that. It also makes the conversation more enjoyable and thus more likely to continue as they grow up.


5) Don't leave questions unanswered. If you can't think of an appropriate answer on the spot, let them know it was a terrific question and get back to them the same day.


6) Avoid showing shock or anger. These emotions can send the message that sex is dirty, harmful or frightening and may have consequences on you child's ability to function socially.


When deciding when to divulge the intricacies of sexual intercourse, remember - Girls can have their first menstrual period between the ages of 9 and 12. Eggs can exist in a girl's reproductive tract just before their first menstruation. Thus as hard as it is to believe, it is very rare but possible for girls to become pregnant as early as age 9. Your child sud understands the following before reaching their early teens:



  • The names and functions of male and female sex organs.

  • What happens during puberty and that those changes signify moving into young womanhood or young manhood.

  • The function of the menstrual cycle.

  • What sexual intercourse is and how females become pregnant.


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