Home |  Astrology |  Classifieds |  Fun |  India |  Kids |  Medical |  Movies |  Immigration |  Cars |  Bikes |  Photos |  Recipes |  Yellow Pages |  City Photos

New
Register Now | Login
Home » Medical » Contraception » Tubal Ligation For Women

Tubal Ligation For Women

»  Cervicle Cap »  Contraceptive Patch »  Contraceptive Sponge
»  Diaphragm »  Female Condom »  Implants
»  Male Condoms »  Spermicidal »  The Vaginal Ring
»  Injectable Contraceptive / The Shot

Tubal Ligation for women is a Permanent surgery to disconnect the fallopian tubes, which transport the eggs from the ovaries to the uterus. Tubal ligation, commonly knows as "getting your tubes tied," is a surgical sterilization technique for women. This procedure closes the fallopian tubes, and stops the egg from traveling to the uterus from the ovary. It also prevents sperm from reaching the fallopian tube to fertilize an egg. In a tubal ligation, fallopian tubes are cut, burned, or blocked with rings, bands or clips.

The surgery is effective immediately. Tubal ligations are 99.5% effective as birth control. They do not protect against sexually transmitted infections, including HIV/AIDS. After surgery, it is recommended that women take 2 to 3 days off and only perform light activities for a week. Sexual activity can start again when a woman feels comfortable, usually after a week. Women who have surgery performed through their vagina are advised not to put anything into their vagina for 2 weeks to avoid infection.

Tubal ligation is considered a permanent method of birth control. Surgery to reverse a tubal ligation is not always effective. In addition, reversals are both difficult and expensive.

Advantages of Tubal Litigation

» 

Permanent birth control.


» 

Immediately effective.


» 

Allows sexual spontaneity.


» 

Requires no daily attention.


» 

Not messy.


» 

Cost-effective in the long run.


Disadvantages of Tubal Litigation

» 

Does not protect against sexually transmitted infections, including HIV/AIDS.


» 

Requires surgery.


» 

Has risks associated with surgery.


» 

More complicated than male sterilization.


» 

May not be reversible.


» 

Possible regret.


» 

Possibility of Post Tubal Ligation Syndrome


The reliability rates quoted for each method are based on extensive independent research. Most contraceptives need to be prescribed by a doctor, though male and female condoms, diaphragms and caps can be bought at a pharmacy.

It is important to note that no birth control method fully protects you against HIV infection or other sexually transmissible diseases (STDs).

The following methods provide NO PROTECTION against HIV-infection: the calendar method, intra-uterine devices, the birth control pill and other hormonal methods of contraception. Coitus Interruptus (withdrawal) is unreliable, both towards prevention of pregnancy and HIV infection.